3 Ways To Gain Visibility By Being Quoted By Other Authors

Have you thought about the idea of being more quotable in your books, speaking, and in the messages that you share with your audience?

The Benefits Of Being Quotable

Being quotable might seem like a vague and fluffy idea when it compares to marketing metrics like cost-to-acquire a customer, or ROI of a pay-per-click campaign on Amazon or Google.

However, according to Phil M Jones and his book “Exactly What To Say” the #1 most downloaded audiobook on Audible.com, he says that the biggest seller of his books has been word-of-mouth.

Therefore, being quotable is not just about being recognized by others it’s a core driver to book sales and business success.

The other day, I was talking to Kare Anderson, former Emmy award-winning NBC, and Wall Street Journal reporter and a current columnist on Forbes.com, about being quotable.

What You Will Learn

This is an overview of the questions that I asked Kare about how to be quotable in our most recent conversation:

  • How can authors make themselves more quotable?
  • What are some examples of how storytelling can help us become more quotable?

How Authors Make Themselves Quotable

According to Reader’s Digest’s from their article “30 of the Most Quotable Books Ever Written” books like Rising Strong by Brené Brown, and The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho, have in common?

They have adopted a lot of the techniques that Kare Anderson mentions to me in our quick chat…

Shaun: How can authors make themselves more quotable?

Kare: That’s a really good question.

It’s something that I learned as a journalist because when a story is well-written or on tv it starts with a specific example.

A specific example can prove a general conclusion yet not the reverse but I also noticed other benefits.

That if you start with something really specific an anecdote, story, or example.

In that first sentence you pull people in because you’ve made it more specific and I want to hear more.

Shaun:How can you be more specific in the anecdotes, stories, or examples you use in your book, or in your marketing?

I believe in specificity because to be specific you have to gain greater self clarity “what are you meaning to say here?”

You also then build more credibility, and you also build in more memorability.

So those three things have become key for me.

Even if I said a fishermen, and a night time policeman, you wonder “where’s that gonna go?”

Because you said those specific professions rather than saying two diverse people.

Shaun:What are some examples of how storytelling can help us become more quotable?

Kare: Sometimes it doesn’t have to be a whole story just a vignette. 

There’s a a guy who wrote a book called “Tell To Win” he’s the co-owner of the Golden State Warriors, Peter Guber.

He said…

“Make your narrative purposeful and relevant to the people you seek to pull in so that they can see a role that they want to play in the story”

– Peter Guber

Shaun: What are some more examples of using storytelling that authors can use to be memorable?

Kare: It has to stick in people’s minds, or give an example like “I’m going to tell you three stories and tell you what they have in common.”

That’s a setup to pull people in wether you are speaking or you are writing a book.

Then you say to them or write this to them and they want to hear what the conclusion is.

Curiosity is a powerful thing and making people curious when you cite individuals or a situation is key.

Conclusion

When considering writing your next book, in your current marketing, or when you are speaking to your audience reference back to the key takeaways that Kare Anderson talks to be more quotable:

  • Use specific stories, anecdotes, and examples from other authors in your books, writing, and when you are speaking
  • Make your narrative purposeful and relevant to the people you seek to pull in so that they can see a role that they want to play in the story
  • Curiosity is a powerful thing and making people curious when you cite individuals or a situation is key